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merriam webster

4 Translation results for near in Spanish

adverb | preposition | verb | adjective

near adverb

unfavorite favorite play sound
cerca; casi

Example sentences of
near adverb

  • The plant was near dead when I got it.
  • as the campers grew cold, so they gravitated nearer to the campfire

Synonyms of
near adverb

near preposition

unfavorite favorite play sound
cerca de

Example sentences of
near preposition

  • I left the box near the door.
  • The cat won't go near fire.
  • There are several beaches near here.
  • She came home near midnight.
  • We feared he was near death.

near verb

unfavorite favorite play sound
neared, has neared, is nearing, nears
acercarse a; estar a punto de

Example sentences of
near verb

  • As the date of the performance neared, we grew more and more anxious.
  • He always cheers up when baseball season nears.
  • The airplane began to descend as it neared the island.
  • He must be nearing 80 years of age.
  • The negotiators were nearing a decision.

near adjective

unfavorite favorite play sound
cercano, próximo; parecido, semejante

Example sentences of
near adjective

  • The nearest grocery store is three blocks away.
  • The near side headlight is out.
  • The airport is quite near.

Synonyms of
near adjective

Detailed synonyms for near adjective

Nearest, closest, next significan el más cercano en el tiempo, el espacio o en grado.
  • Nearest, closest indica el más alto grado de proximidad en relaciones de tiempo, espacio o parentesco <named the baby after their nearest relative> <the closest house was two miles away>.
  • Next suele indicar sucesión o precedencia inmediata en un orden, una serie o una secuencia <the next day>.

Related phrases for near

Reverse translation for near

cerca  - close, near, nearby 
casi  - almost, nearly, virtually, hardly 
cercano  - near, close 
próximo  - near, close, next, following 
parecido  - similar, alike 
semejante  - similar, alike, such 
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